Back To School Traditions Around The World

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Have you ever been curious about the different back to school traditions all over the world? It’s nearing the end of the school year here in Australia, but for the academic year is just starting for the rest of the world. Here’s a look at what first day of school is like in different countries all over the globe.

Germany

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The first day of school in Germany is celebrated because they have no preschool. German kids receive Schultüte, which roughly translates to “school bag.” But these are is no ordinary school bags! They are giant cones filled with school supplies, toys, and candies! Talk about a sweet treat!

France

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If most kids had their way, I am pretty sure they would want to study in France. French schools have one of the shortest academic years in the world. They devote 2 hours of lunch (I wonder how big their lunch bags are!) and have Wednesdays off! They do, however, still have to go to School for the half the day on Saturday. But still!

Brazil

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Brazilian schools return in February – just like us in Australia! Prices of school supplies like colouring pencils sometimes rise by as much as 500%! That is why some mums stock up on school goodies way as early as 6 months before school starts.

Japan

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Japanese children also receive a special bag on their first day of school, just like Germans. They receive a sturdy backpack called randoseru. These durable bags are handed down from one family member to another. These bags also typically carry the children’s first packed lunch of the school year, which typically consists of gohan (rice) and quail eggs. Japanese believe that this tradition brings good luck. Traditionally, boys carry black-coloured randoserus and girls carry red ones. Today, these bags come in different styles and colours.

Russia

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September 1 marks the first day of school in Russia. This day is also known as “Knowledge and Skills Day”. Russian school children typically have flowers bouquets for their teachers, and they get a balloon in return.

The first bell is a tradition where one of the youngest girls in school is hoisted upon the shoulders of one of the oldest boys to parade around the students as she rings the first bell of the school year.

Kazakhstan

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In Kazakhstan, children aged seven years old start their education with Tyl Ashar, or the “Initiation to Education” day. Parents cook large feasts of lamb, other treats and sweet desserts to mark this ceremony. Kazakh children also recite their Jety-ata (seven generations of grandfathers) from memory to honour their ancestors.

India

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Pravesanothsavam is the first day of school in India. Special presents for the children mark this occasion. Umbrellas are popular gifts aside from school essentials because the first day of classes normally comes in the monsoon months.

Italy

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Schools in Italy do not require uniforms except for children in kindergarten. They wear a work apron called grembiule. Boys usually wear a blue and white checked apron and girls wear pink and red checked ones. In primary schools, the colour of the aprons changes to deep blue.

Netherlands

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Bakfietsen or cargo bikes are a popular eco-friendly way to go around town in the Netherlands. You would always see these bikes transporting children every year on the first day of school rolls around. 

USA

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The US marks the first day of school with first day pictures! Kids typically wear their brand new first day of school outfits, holding signs of the grades they are starting written on it. Pinterest has a lot of first day picture ideas is you’re looking for some inspiration.

I know that the school year is winding down here in Australia but it’s never really too late to start organising for the next school year. Don’t lose any of your kids’ school supplies with our name labels. They are easy to use and looks very stylish! They are perfect for labelling pencils, lunch boxes, activity books, water bottles and many more! Being 100% waterproof they’re safe to use on most containers in dishwashers, sterilisers, microwaves and freezers.

back to school traditions

Do you have any back to school traditions?

We would love to know what your suggestions! Let us know in the comment section below. Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, follow us on Instagram, or pin this post on Pinterest.